My Straight Son

milkboys Films, Films & Cinema 2 Comments

Diego, a successful fashion photographer in Caracas, has commitment phobia but the very night he is about to tell Fabrizio, his Doctor boyfriend that he will move in with him after all, is the same night that Fabrizio is the victim of a vicious fatal gay bashing. It is also the same night that Armando, his estranged teenage son, turns up from Spain to stay with him for a few months whilst his mother goes to London to study for a Masters degree.

These very melodramatic first 24 hours set the tone for a hectic story packed full of characters that deliberately sets out to tug at your heartstrings for the next two hours. Father and son are like strangers and must learn how to adapt to each other. Armando to the unknown homosexual world of a father grieving for his partner that he had never met, and Diego to the closed attitude of his adolescent son.

Added to the mix are both Diego’s parents and Fabrizio’s family which is pretty homophobic and obsessed with watching Venezuela’s most popular TV Chat Show with its buxom bigoted host who loves to stir up fear of the unknown with her inflammatory remarks. Plus Diego’s friend that keeps going back to her abusive boyfriend who beats her up most days, and the penniless trans choreographer who has to subsidise her modern dance troupe by still doing her lip-syncing drag act at a gay club at night to pay the rent. Between them all director and writer Miguel Ferrari insures that he covers the whole gamut of social issues from gay parenting and partners rights to gender identity.

Despite its (too) many layers and all its plot complications there is something very compelling about the unravelling of the relationship between the father and son that ensures our investment in watching to the end to see how its all going to turn out. Maybe it’s the sonorous tones of the orchestra’s lush string section that pervades the dramatic soundtrack, or just seeing a cute nervous Armando mastering the art of the Tango so that he can win the heart of his new online girlfriend.

It’s sweet, sometimes funny and moving with some fine performances from a talented cast. In Spain the film won the Best Foreign Picture Goya (their Oscars) when it still had the original and much better title of Azul y No Tan Rosa which literally translates into ‘Blue, and Not So Pink’, a slightly less clumsy title than My Straight Son.

Netflix’ very queer teen drama Élite gets a second season

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Élite, Netflix’s latest and gayest original teen drama, has just been renewed for a second season. The show follows the students of Las Encinas, a Spanish high school for the country’s wealthiest teens. But when the school on the poor side of town collapses, three students get scholarships to Las Encinas and their presence ignites a train of events that ultimately results in murder.

Viewers have been pleasantly surprised by the unexpectedly queer series. Élite boasts two gay characters, a few bisexuals, polyamory, and even a plotline destigmatising HIV. Combine that with the high stakes of teen drama, a beautiful cast, and a murder mystery, it’s no wonder the show’s garnered such an enthusiastic fan base.

Élite is streaming on Netflix now

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Moiré

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Each house locked away the secret of a family. For one hour a day Sergio, helped by his grandmother, carry out his desires in a home dominated by his grandfather. A twist will force Elena, his mother, to make a decision that will change their lives.