Surviving homelessness as a queer teen

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Travis was disowned by his family at 17 for being gay. He used his savings to move to Los Angeles and lived on the street for weeks before the Los Angeles LGBT Center provided him a bed and helped him find a job. Now he’s helping others in his situation.

“In my mom’s house, it’s God first and then family,” said Travis in a heartbreaking interview. Check out his story below.

Thanks Taylor but, can you not?

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Taylor Swift gave a gift to her queer fan base in the form of a summertime gay anthem called “You Need To Calm Down,” and on behalf of a grateful community, I must say: thank you, Taylor!

Also: is there any chance you kept a receipt?

Please understand: I appreciate the effort. Like God Herself, I love a trier. It is a thrilling and still somewhat new experience to be part of the textual narrative in pop music, and I am delighted for the young queer kid who’s hearing the song and feeling seen, supported and nourished for the first time. It’s important! And the song has already lodged itself in my frontal lobe and kicked both of those new Bon Iver songs out of their seats. Between “Calm Down,” Katy Perry’s “Never Really Over,” and the whole new Carly Rae Jepsen album, the 2019 pop sound palette seems to be “the Fletch soundtrack,” and I am all the way here for it. I will hear “Calm Down” at pool parties this summer, and I will sing along. It is nice.

But attempting to write a gay anthem in 2019 reeks of sweat and substandard self-awareness. The classics of the past— your “I Will Survive,” your “It’s Raining Men,” your “Pull Up To The Bumper”— they gave us our gayness indirectly. They were anthems of strength, of perseverance, of plain, joyous horniness, served up vicariously, the way it had to be done back then. The singers, always women, almost always black, were our stand-ins. We found these songs and made them ours. These days, LGBTQ wokeness is a box to check off in a marketing plan, and when there are perfectly capable queer artists out there, sitting down as a straight person and setting out to write a gay anthem is very much like trying to give yourself a nickname.

Read on…

YouTuber Daniel Howell came out

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Daniel Howell, a YouTuber from the UK with 6.5 million subscribers came out in a video titled Basically I’m gay. “We live in a heteronormative world,” the 27-year-old says. “What this means is that most people are presumed to be straight so, if you’re not, at some point you have to come out. So yep: I’m here, I’m queer and don’t worry, I’m still filled with existential fear.”

In the 45-minute video, Howell goes on to explain his coming out journey, why he has decided to do so now, and just what queerness means to him.