Grindr kicks of Kindr campaign

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Grindr wants to take a step to combat racist and shaming language on user profiles. RuPaul’s Drag Race contestant The Vixen, former Queer Eye host Jai Rodriguez, Joel Kim Booster, Malcolm Robinson, Rakeem Cunningham, Ray (Emilio Amador), and Jasmine are featured in the “kindr” campaign from Grindr against sexual racism, speaking about their experiences of racism on- and offline.

“If you don’t put ‘no Asians’ in your profile, it doesn’t mean you have to f**k Asians now,” says Booster. “It just means I don’t have to see it….For you to say ‘I know what every Asian guy looks like and I know for a fact that I would not be attracted to any of them?’ That comes from a racist place. Because you don’t know what we all look like. That’s ugly.”

“You don’t know what the person on the other side of the phone is going through,” adds Rodriguez. “You have no idea what their experience is, or what else they have going on, or what that comment might do to them.”

Grindr, also released a statement further elaborating on the Kindr initiative:

Sexual racism, transphobia, fat and femme shaming and further forms of othering such as stigmatization of HIV positive individuals are pervasive problems in the LGBTQ community. These community issues get brought onto our platform, and as a leader in the gay dating space, Grindr has a responsibility to not only protect our users, but also to set the standard for the broader community that we serve.

Online discrimination has reached epidemic proportions affecting not only Grindr but other social networks. Our ‘Kindr’ initiative is a rallying call for Grindr and our community to take a stand against sexual racism and all forms of othering.

Headspace

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For some not affected by it, it’s probably hard to visualise the type of discomfort and small acts of discrimination transgender people face on a daily basis.

Public bathrooms are an easy one to identify because of the months-long controversy surrounding them, but the potential danger also extends to places like locker rooms and doctors’ offices. In the short film Headspace, trans individuals think through day-to-day obstacles that can arise.

Boarding School

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When troubled 12-year-old Jacob Felsen is sent away to boarding school, he enters every kid’s worst nightmare: A creepy old mansion, deserted except for six other teenage misfits and two menacing and mysterious teachers. As events become increasingly horrific, Jacob must conquer his fears to find the strength to survive.

Horror films have begun a redefinition in recent years, a deeper representation of horrors of the world personified. Monsters have generated new fears in the silent haunting of A Quiet Place, while racism has found its own sadistic representation within a reinvigorated form of the body snatchers with last year’s Get Out. This year, re-innovation has found itself in Boarding School, a film by director Boaz Yakin that examines the ostracized differences perceived in others and in one’s own self.

Boarding School is not without its flaws, yet its meanings and representations dive deeper than the typical thrillers that have come before it. History is imbued between the lines of exposition and dialogue, discovering who we are and what will come to pass to become who we will be. I was pleasantly surprised at the depth Boarding School is able to achieve, as well as the entertainment it was able to maintain – placing itself within this new generation of horror.

Read on…

Troye about Conversion Therapy

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Learning about the harmful messages of conversion therapy for the film Boy Erased led gay musician and actor Troye Sivan to imagine the effect on vulnerable young people, he said Thursday night on The Late Show With Stephen Colbert.

“When we arrived on set day one, they gave us the resources kids would typically get when they arrived at the [conversion therapy] camp, like actual printed-out resources,” Sivan told Colbert. These packets outlined the strict rules queer kids are given at the camps, including limited body contact as well as a mandatory dress code that required girls to carry purses and wear skirts while forbidding boys to wear tight-fitting clothes.

“I remember being so relieved when I came out to myself because I was like, OK, this is not something that I can change. It’s not something that I have to fight anymore,” Sivan said. This added a weight to learning that youth in “ex-gay” camps are told, “No, this is not you, you weren’t born like this. This is a God-shaped hole you are trying to fill with these homosexual tendencies,” he explained.

Filming Boy Erased caused the singer to imagine “being 15 again when I was sort of at my most vulnerable and having that put back on me, and being set up with that impossible task of trying to change this thing that is ultimately unchangeable.”

Sivan hopes parents see the film and learn that “your reaction to your kid coming out can really shape their lives.” Boy Erased will play at the Toronto International Film Festival Saturday and open in U.S. theaters November 2.

Sipping

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Santiago and Jared , two teenagers of opposite personality spend an afternoon together looking for ways to overcome their differences. After an act that begins as a game their senses will find the space to coincide. Click the subtitles button in the bottom left corner of the player if the subs don’t appear automatically.

Trans Girl speaks about brutal Hate from her Schoolmates’ Parents

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Maddison, a 12-year-old girl living in the U.S. state of Oklahoma was the target of extremely hateful and violent comments from adults in her town.  The disturbing comments on Facebook drew national attention a couple weeks ago because of their casual brutality.

“If he wants to be a female make him a female. A good sharp knife will do the job really quick,” one parent wrote. “Just tell the kids to kick ass in the bathroom and it won’t want to come back!” wrote another. It got so bad that the whole school district had to shut down.

Now Maddison is speaking out against the hate, while her family gets ready to leave the town. But her trouble in the small town started well before that discussion. Maddison’s family moved to Achille, Oklahoma, several years ago, and she presented as a girl. In fifth grade, a teacher outed her after looking up Maddie’s old school records, and then the whole town knew.

School administrators called in her parents and told them that their daughter would have to use the staff bathroom. “To be honest, Maddie didn’t care,” her mother Brandy said. “They had already shown Maddie the staff bathroom and she was like ‘Oh, it’s bigger, it smells better.’ She was happy.”

But people in the town talked and the issue went beyond bathrooms. Maddie had a confrontation with Burney Crenshaw, a adult man, when she attended a father/daughter dance with her stepdad Cory this past April. Crenshaw asked her repeatedly if she was a boy, and she kept on saying that she was a girl, until her father intervened. “My personal opinion is when you’re asking somebody if you’re a boy or a girl, you’re asking what their genitalia is,” her dad said. “My daughter’s genitalia? None of your business.”

When she started middle school, no one showed her where the staff bathroom is, so she went to the girls room. Crenshaw heard about it, posted about it on Facebook, and that’s when the violent comments started. “Who would do that? To a 12-year-old?” Maddie said in an interview with Vice News Tonight on HBO. “They can be hateful and rude about it, but they ain’t dragging me down.”

Despite her brave front, the family is too scared to stay in Achille. Even during the interview, someone in a truck slowed down in front of their house and the police warned Vice about doing an interview in their town. “This is why we’re moving,” Brandy said.

After the threats, the family started a GoFundMe page to move away from the town where they no longer feel safe. They have raised almost $54,000 so far and the family said that they have found a new home in Houston.

41% of Americans who are transgender tried to kill themselves at some point in their lives, compared to 4.6% of the general public.