First trailer for the Steven Universe film

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The very queer cartoon series Steven Universe just dropped a trailer for its upcoming movie adaptation. The show follows a group of genderless aliens called The Crystal Gems. They, along with half-human, half-Gem Steven, attempt to save Earth from the uncaring rulers of the Gem Homeworld.

The show, which also featured a same-sex wedding, made history when it won its first GLAAD Media Award for Outstanding Kids & Family Program this year. It was, in fact, the first animated series to do so.

The Real Thing

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The seven-minute film The Real Thing, which screened at the 2017 Outfest in Los Angeles and the 2018 New England Film Festival, follows Allie (Sophie Giannamore), who has transitioned while her soldier father has been on an active tour of duty.

Unfortunately for Allie, her classmates and teachers have yet to accept her as her authentic self ― and when she returns home to spot her dad standing in her room, she’s worried he’ll react similarly.

Pre-drink

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Alexe and Carl are pre-gaming at her place before meeting up with their friends at a bar. Alexe just transitioned, and this boozy evening might change the dynamics of their friendship forever as the two decide to have “no strings attached” sex.

 

Is Stranger Things’ Will gay?

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The new season of Stranger Things dropped on Netflix a few days ago and after two seasons of abduction and possession, Noah Schnapp’s character Will Byers  spends the first half of the latest run with a far more human issue on his hands – all his friends have coupled up and all he wants to do is get back to the good old days of cycling around and playing D&D.

One scene from the show’s third episode, titled The Case of the Missing Lifeguard, though, hints at the Will’s sexuality. Spoilers ahead.

The scene in question sees Will attempting to interest Lucas and Mike in a new Dungeons & Dragons campaign, but it’s obvious that he’s the only one really into the game. The other two boys laugh off his enthusiasm and derail the game with conversation about their respective girlfriends, frustrating the already disheartened Will.

Fed up, Will calls an end to the campaign and rushes out of Mike’s basement, though both Mike and Lucas attempt to call him back. Mike rushes out after his friend and this happens:

Now, obviously this could just be an angry comment thrown out during an argument, but the charged silence and the look of stunned betrayal on Will’s face suggest that Mike’s words have a bit more weight than suggesting that Will just doesn’t like girls yet. Mike apologises, swearing he’s not trying to be a jerk and goes on about how everyone’s growing up, but Will still leaves, even more upset with his friends.

While it’s never discussed or even hinted at again, we can’t help but consider if this is the Duffer Brothers’ way of alluding to Will’s sexuality. Unlike Robin’s coming out scene, the idea that Will might be gay doesn’t lead to an intimate conversation or touching moment between friends.

But the implication does bring back a conversation that began in season one when Stranger Things fans were questioning Will’s sexuality. In the freshman season, Will is continuously referenced by the group’s bullies using homophobic slurs and his story of being dragged into the Upside Down and left for dead was likened to how queer characters are often treated as “other” or thrown in the closet.

Back then Noah Schnapp said that for him Will’s sexuality is besides the point but it looks like many fans disagree.

First They Came

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Mass shootings are a regualr occurrence in the United States, so it’s heartbreaking but not surprising when a 16-year-old high school student like Odessa Shlain Goldberg says she no longer trusts people, no matter if strangers or otherwise as much as she used to.

These violent outbursts of a divided society affected her life in several ways, from shooting drills at school to an unshakeable fear in crowded places. It’s also what led her to her topic for the Our Pride Student Video Competition, for which she won first place.

Her film combines Rufus Wainwright’s rendition of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah and Martin Niemöller post-World War II poem First They Came with images of various mass shootings in the US.

‘The film illustrates how passivity in the face of injustice is complicity during World War II, but instead reframes and rewrites the 1946 poem to focus on the prolific, devastating shootings in schools and public institutions,’ Goldberg said of her film.