Gay Men tortured & killed in Chechen Concentration Camps

milkboys News & Articles 8 Comments

Earlier this month more than 100 queer men have been arrested in Chechnya and rounded up in concentration camps where many have been tortured and at least 3 killed according to the BBC and the Huffington Post.

The Russian opposition news publication Novaya Gazeta first reported that men between the ages of 16 and 50 were being gathered and arrested “in connection with their nontraditional sexual orientation, or suspicion of such.” The paper published the names of three murder victims, and speculated many more had likely been killed, as well.

Speaking to the New York Timesthough, Chechnyan leader Ramzan Kadyrov dismissed the claims, and denied that any gay people even exist within the region at all. “You cannot arrest or repress people who just don’t exist in the republic,” he said. “If such people existed in Chechnya, law enforcement would not have to worry about them, as their own relatives would have sent them to where they could never return.”

The sweep of arrests was apparently prompted by an application of the gay rights group GayRussia.ru for rights to celebrate a Pride parade— rights which, unsurprisingly, were immediately denied, and met with severe authoritative backlash.

Foreign ministers from the European Union, the US and UK have all urged Russia to urgently intervene. “We condemn violence against any individuals based on their sexual orientation or any other basis,’ a US State Department spokesperson said. “We urge the Russian government to conduct an independent and credible investigation into the alleged killings and mass arrests, and hold the perpetrators responsible. We were likewise deeply disturbed by local authorities statements that apparently condone and even incite violence against LGBTI persons.”

Periodical Political Post *36

milkboys News & Articles 8 Comments

Queer News 

Other News 

Periodical Political Post *35

milkboys News & Articles 4 Comments

Queer News 

Other News 

YouTube just got a Queer Filter

milkboys News & Articles, News & Opinions 9 Comments

Queer content creators have accused YouTube of hiding their videos with a new “restricted mode”. The video sharing site introduced the feature to automatically filter out “offensive content”.

According to Google, the company uses “community flagging, age-restriction, and other signals to identify and filter out potentially inappropriate content”.

Rowan Ellis is one of many LGBT creators who have criticised YouTube for the feature, arguing that it means their content is being blocked. Ellis made a video hitting out at YouTube, and when restricted mode is turned on the video is hidden. She said that move by YouTube implies a “bias” because it “equates LGBT with ‘not family friendly’.”

 NeonFiona, another LGBT creator posted screen shots of her channel without the mode, and with the mode. Videos with the words gay, lesbian and bisexual were all hidden from her channel with the mode switched on. Trans YouTuber SeaineLove also found her videos were hidden with the feature. She considers the videos that were hidden to be “pretty G rated”.

The YouTubers who are finding that their content is being censored have expressed that they’re not worried about the effect on the ratings, but the effect on young people seeking out their own LGBT education. Seaine said she wanted young LGBT identifying people to “be able to watch my videos and go ‘Hey, I feel the same way! That’s how I am too!”

NeonFiona added: “Kids who want to know about different orientations and definitions and about the history of LGBT people, etc, they can’t access that when their videos are being restricted. Restricting these videos makes it harder for these kids to find information they need and the community that they’ve been missing.”

A spokesperson for Google said: “Restricted Mode is an optional feature used by a very small subset of users who want to have a more limited YouTube experience. Some videos that cover subjects like health, politics and sexuality may not appear for users and institutions that choose to use this feature.”

YouTube has always claimed to be queer friendly. But it’s making it seem that all videos that talk about someone’s sexual, romantic or gender identity – aren’t appropriate, even when they don’t show it in a sexual way.

via PinkNews & Affinity

Periodical Political Post *34

milkboys News & Articles 6 Comments

Queer News

Other News

  • New US healthcare plan would bring billions in tax cuts for
    the rich while pushing millions of poor out of healthcare
  • 70% of benefits of Trump childcare credits will go to the rich
  • Experts find mass grave at ex-Catholic orphanage in Ireland
  • Trump says Jews are trying real hard to make him look bad
  • Sex ed finally education becomes compulsory in the UK

Periodical Political Post *33

milkboys News & Articles 21 Comments

Queer News

Other News

Periodical Political Post *32

milkboys News & Articles 25 Comments

Queer News

Other News

Because some positivity can’t hurt these days, have (and click) this :)

Transcending Self

milkboys News & Articles, Really Random 39 Comments

About two years ago, I began photographing transgender and “gender-expansive” children and young adults in the United States and Europe. I wanted to ask this question: “Who are we beyond ideas tied to our gender?” The answer is critical not only to the transgender community, I believe, but to everyone.

In the younger participants, I have found self-assuredness and confidence; they are clear about who they are. In the older youths — especially the nonbinary ones who identify as both genders, or neither — I see a willingness to break free from boxes society puts us into. In all of them, there is creativity and compassion for peers and strangers alike. — Annie Tritt, photographer

Zak, 13 | Isle of Wight, England. Transgender boy.

“When I was 12, I realized that transgender was a thing. It made sense. I’m straight — I’m a straight guy in a girl’s body. I had very distorted expectations, though, and thought that I would be able to have hormones and operations straightaway. The process is too long. I hate looking like this, I hate the body that I have. I want it to transform, and it is wrong that I have to wait until I’m an adult.”

Max, 13 | Bay Area, California. Nonbinary.

“I asked my mom if I could text her something. I texted her that I am attracted to boys and that I feel more girl than boy. Later that year, I found the term nonbinary. It just felt right. I still am often scared of the reactions of people when I tell them. As a trans person who has experienced hate, I want people to understand that nobody deserves to be hated. Everyone deserves love, regardless of race, gender, sexuality.”

Azaj, 17 | Oakland, Calif. Transgender girl.

“It is really different living as myself. Before, I felt like I was always trying to squeeze into jeans that were six sizes too small, but now it feels like I am in jeans that were made just for me. I no longer wake up hating myself or this world that does not understand me. I want to make sure the world does not take as long as it did to be open to gay and bi people. I hope that I am able to help girls like me, so they don’t go through what I did. I want to slay the gods 100 times over doing things that trans girls have never done. I want to be the face of equality.”

More on the photographers website…

Enforced Common Sense: How Iceland keeps its Teens healthy

milkboys News & Articles 7 Comments

In Iceland, teenage smoking, drinking and drug use have been radically cut in the past 20 years. How did they do it, and why won’t other countries follow suit?

It’s a little before three on a sunny Friday afternoon and Laugardalur Park, near central Reykjavik, looks practically deserted. There’s an occasional adult with a pushchair, but the park’s surrounded by apartment blocks and houses, and school’s out – so where are all the kids?

Walking with me are Gudberg Jónsson, a local psychologist, and Harvey Milkman, an American psychology professor who teaches for part of the year at Reykjavik University. Twenty years ago, says Gudberg, Icelandic teens were among the heaviest-drinking youths in Europe. “You couldn’t walk the streets in downtown Reykjavik on a Friday night because it felt unsafe,” adds Milkman. “There were hordes of teenagers getting in-your-face drunk.”

We approach a large building. “And here we have the indoor skating,” says Gudberg. A couple of minutes ago, we passed two halls dedicated to badminton and ping pong. Here in the park, there’s also an athletics track, a geothermally heated swimming pool and – at last – some visible kids, excitedly playing football on an artificial pitch.

Young people aren’t hanging out in the park right now, Gudberg explains, because they’re in after-school classes in these facilities, or in clubs for music, dance or art. Or they might be on outings with their parents.

Today, Iceland tops the European table for the cleanest-living teens. The percentage of 15- and 16-year-olds who had been drunk in the previous month plummeted from 42 per cent in 1998 to 5 per cent in 2016. The percentage who have ever used cannabis is down from 17 per cent to 7 per cent. Those smoking cigarettes every day fell from 23 per cent to just 3 per cent.

The way the country has achieved this turnaround has been both radical and evidence-based, but it has relied a lot on what might be termed enforced common sense. “This is the most remarkably intense and profound study of stress in the lives of teenagers that I have ever seen,” says Milkman. “I’m just so impressed by how well it is working.”

If it was adopted in other countries, Milkman argues, the Icelandic model could benefit the general psychological and physical wellbeing of millions of kids, not to mention the coffers of healthcare agencies and broader society. It’s a big if.

Read on…