The documentary ‘American Circumcision‘ is live on Netflix

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American Circumcision, the controversial documentary by director Brendon Marotta, is available on Netflix. In the film, director Marotta questions why the surgery is routinely done on infants in the U.S. and its ramifications.

Marotta said that the “routine surgery” done on infants leads to a particular kind of PTSD that may contribute to what we refer to as “toxic masculinity” now. According to Marotta, “Even the most pro-circumcision doctor in our film admits the pain from circumcision creates a lasting change in behavior that has been scientifically proven. Change in behavior is a form of memory, what in this case is known as somatic memory.”

Marotta continues, “When it comes to toxic masculinity or rape culture, one of our interview subjects notes that circumcision teaches men that if you are bigger and stronger than someone else, you get to do what you want to their body. It teaches this in their first shared sexual experience, the first time someone else touches their genitals, and in the relationship all other relationships will be patterned on, their relationship with their mother.”

Marotta understands that some people might have some resistance to this information and underscores his point by adding, “Imagine a friend told you when he was an infant, his parents paid someone to cut off his pinky finger without anesthesia. Would it be hard to accept this experience was formative in some way? If he told you he felt he had lasting trauma, would you believe him? Which is more personal — a finger or the penis?”

Read on…

nakedyouth

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In nakedyouth director Shishido takes us on a journey through the uncertainty and excitement of young love. This gentle short film quivers with sexual tension, which is linked to the natural world…

 

Brotherly

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Based on a true story of two brothers in 1970s Ohio. It tells of their abandonment by their alcoholic parents and how the brothers turned to each other for support.

We Once Were Tide

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Set on the Isle of Wight, the film tells the story of Anthony and Kyle, and their last night together as Kyle moves away leaving Anthony to look after his terminally ill mother. Poetic in nature, the film is concerned with exploring the intimate and often unspoken moment in which we give something special away.

My Straight Son

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Diego, a successful fashion photographer in Caracas, has commitment phobia but the very night he is about to tell Fabrizio, his Doctor boyfriend that he will move in with him after all, is the same night that Fabrizio is the victim of a vicious fatal gay bashing. It is also the same night that Armando, his estranged teenage son, turns up from Spain to stay with him for a few months whilst his mother goes to London to study for a Masters degree.

These very melodramatic first 24 hours set the tone for a hectic story packed full of characters that deliberately sets out to tug at your heartstrings for the next two hours. Father and son are like strangers and must learn how to adapt to each other. Armando to the unknown homosexual world of a father grieving for his partner that he had never met, and Diego to the closed attitude of his adolescent son.

Added to the mix are both Diego’s parents and Fabrizio’s family which is pretty homophobic and obsessed with watching Venezuela’s most popular TV Chat Show with its buxom bigoted host who loves to stir up fear of the unknown with her inflammatory remarks. Plus Diego’s friend that keeps going back to her abusive boyfriend who beats her up most days, and the penniless trans choreographer who has to subsidise her modern dance troupe by still doing her lip-syncing drag act at a gay club at night to pay the rent. Between them all director and writer Miguel Ferrari insures that he covers the whole gamut of social issues from gay parenting and partners rights to gender identity.

Despite its (too) many layers and all its plot complications there is something very compelling about the unravelling of the relationship between the father and son that ensures our investment in watching to the end to see how its all going to turn out. Maybe it’s the sonorous tones of the orchestra’s lush string section that pervades the dramatic soundtrack, or just seeing a cute nervous Armando mastering the art of the Tango so that he can win the heart of his new online girlfriend.

It’s sweet, sometimes funny and moving with some fine performances from a talented cast. In Spain the film won the Best Foreign Picture Goya (their Oscars) when it still had the original and much better title of Azul y No Tan Rosa which literally translates into ‘Blue, and Not So Pink’, a slightly less clumsy title than My Straight Son.