Comments 20

  1. Oh WOW!
    Such amazingly perfect timing to see this video at the end of my day.
    I was thinking of all the old homeless people I come across each day here in San Diego. So many of them everywhere. I was thinking how, even in their difficulty, they manage to look so human, look so good.
    And then this video pops up.

    Beauty is everywhere.
    My heart just stops when my husband smiles at me.
    My heart just stops when in the midst of any of our too frequent arguments he looks sadly at me.
    People are beautiful.
    You only need to see it.

  2. This makes me so sad (that so many are shocked or in disbelief), and so happy at the same time. I remember being that age and thinking no one could find me attractive. And now I look at those kids and see so much beauty. We’re always tougher on ourselves than the rest of the world can ever be.

  3. I’m glad a few of the victims of this charade were smart enough to see through it all – I especially like the girl around 2:00. This bee ess is what comes from the phony-baloney self-esteem nonsense handed out in schools these days – no winners or losers, everybody gets a ‘participation’ trophy even if their contribution to the effort wasn’t worth a sh!t.

    Can we get back to a merit based education system, thank you very much. Can we get back to ‘art’ being the product of genuine inspiration, craftsmanship, and skill instead of mere emotion?

    Schools should push each child’s envelope to the breaking point, and maybe past it, until every kid gets mad enough, hurt enough, motivated enough, SHARK ENOUGH to reach up, grab, and maximize their true potential. The real world isn’t for the faint of heart. Success doesn’t come easy. Real self respect, real satisfaction, and real achievement must be earned – and if you get there, you’ll see that that’s a real work of art.

    1. Ah, this was not lost on you, then.

      Of course it was bullshit. That was part of the point, but the other part, and far more important, is that almost every person *became* beautiful when they were told they were, even the ugliest.

  4. “Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around.”
    ~Leo Buscaglia

  5. @horsey:
    Schools should push each child’s envelope to the breaking point, and maybe past it, until every kid gets mad enough, hurt enough, motivated enough, SHARK ENOUGH to reach up, grab, and maximize their true potential. The real world isn’t for the faint of heart.

    Great statements, horsey. I agree fully.

  6. “You must be fun at parties…”

    That’s why I should go with him …. to *tame him*. :-)
    .

  7. @gfron1:
    “This makes me so sad (that so many are shocked or in disbelief), and so happy at the same time.”

    I think there’s a fine (psychological) line between parent(s) who constantly tell their children how beautiful they are and those who never (or very nearly never) give compliments such as this to their children.

    Some can (and do) grow up thinking they are the center of their (and everyone else’s) universe, and those who think like you mentioned: I remember being that age and thinking no one could find me attractive.

    One way or another, being told (or not) they are can have a profound effect on so many people as they grow and navigate through their own “social hell” — which many think is the time they’re in school.

    Thanks for pointing that out in your way.

  8. ALL of my above posts were replies (clicking on REPLY), so why weren’t they accepted as such?
    .

  9. Horselips: What you have described (unconditional appreciation) is a very neat description of the female (motherly) attitude towards the young. Whereas, the male (fatherly) way involves conditional reward. The reason why you don’t see the latter, but see the former, is that women’s ways have taken over our culture. That is why you see helicopter parenting (which is really helicopter mothering). Not everyone can be beautiful, and not everyone needs to be beautiful. Being beautiful is a feminine preoccupation. The real way to find out that you are beautiful is to find someone who actually thinks you are beautiful. The women’s movement has removed the number one source of appreciation for boys, which used to be men, and coincidentally men are the ones whose opinions boys care about the most. Men are also very diverse in what they find attractive in boys. Some like big ears, some like skinny, others like chubby, some like geeky, others like athletic, some like a dark tan, others like pale skin and freckles, and on and on.

  10. Interestting comment from Wordworth and I would totally agree with all of it. But men don’t feel able to fight back and feminist don’t care/understand what they are destroying.

  11. @Wordworth:
    … that women’s ways have taken over our culture. … and on and on.

    Are you pregnant? Experiencing cravings for pickles and peanut butter at 10:00 pm?

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~`

    Again, your “REPLY” isn’t taking it as a REPLY.

  12. I am shocked. I am not amiss to saying that what is beautiful is not the common nor even the typical. NOT EVERYONE IS BEAUTIFUL. THERE ARE UGLY PEOPLE. The plain old dandelion, however common and sometimes edible is not a rose (no part edible at all). Telling everyone they are ‘beautiful’ demeans the very concept. This is disgusting. GOOD people are many and often encountered surprisingly, and good people are everywhere. BEAUTY IS ESPECIAL AND RARE, AND OFT DANGEROUS, EVEN POISONOUS, BUT BEAUTIFUL ANYWAY.

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