Periodical Political Post *15

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The other F-Word

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Gay men have complicated relationships with the word “faggot.” While we’re at a moment in time where lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people are slowly gaining rights and visibility, that doesn’t mean the stigma surrounding gay identity has dissipated. And, for some, the words that have historically been used to inflict pain on our community still hold a lot of power.

Some find power in taking back or reclaiming words — like “queer.” We use the word queer because we find it the best way to describe the vast spectrum of experiences and identities that receive visibility in our section — and because we think the word is the most inclusive.

However, the word “faggot” still inspires a mixed response among gay men, and that response is often due to context and intent.

Cut Video brought 30 gay men together for a word association exercise and asked them to respond to the word “faggot.” Predictably, their responses were mixed and often times emotional.

“[It’s] the last sort of acceptable kind of dirty word that people still say in public a lot,” one middle-aged gay man says. “Not even if you’re apparently gay but I guess if you’re just suspected to be gay, it’s very common. So I look at it as a very abusive, vocal assault.”

Check out the video above. What are your thoughts about the word “faggot”? Let us know in the comments below.

Cut Video made similar videos about the word gay and the phrase being a man.

Summer Camp for free Kids

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Every summer, Lindsay Morris goes to camp. She sits around a fire roasting marshmallows, she kayaks, she swims. On the last night of a relaxing week, she eagerly awaits what she believes is the camp’s highlight: a spectacular fashion show, where younger attendees strut down the runway sporting a look of their choosing. Kids of both genders zip up silky dresses and rock rainbow-hued gowns.

summer-camp

The camp is for families that teach their children about gender fluidity, allowing them to choose clothes and pastimes based on genuine interest rather than societal expectations.

Morris, a photographer, has acted as the camp’s documentarian for years, hoping to log the friendships formed among campers and moments their parents want to relish. Her images were published byThe New York Times, but she vowed to keep the name of the camp and campers anonymous. “It was through this experience and several others that the parents came to the consensus that only through visibility was the conversation going to move forward,” she said.

Parents play an important role at camp. Here a father helps his son into a dress for the talent show.

A father helps his son into a dress for the talent show.

And move forward it has; the images have been compiled into a book, and will be featured in the artist’s first solo show this month in New York City.

Morris believes introducing children to gender fluidity is essential to raising kids who are open to difference. “Children are affected by anti-gay prejudice and adults have a responsibility to address it,” she says. “They have this innate ability and eagerness to have honest conversations, and when these discussions are presented in a non-judgemental fashion, the children benefit.”

The camp is organized and run by parents who support their children’s exploration of gender fluidity. It provides a haven devoid of the unexpected prejudices that can arise at school and in everyday life outside of the house. And Morris’ images make the laid back air of the camp palpable. In one of her most striking images, a young, blonde boy poses confidently in a halter dress; his stance can’t be described as masculine or feminine, but merely at ease. He gazes at the camera, smirking proudly.

Left: A child shows off his favorite nightgown. Right: Throughout the weekend make-up is applied, removed and reapplied and wardrobe change is constant.

Throughout the weekend make-up is applied, removed and reapplied by the kids and wardrobe change is constant.

“I hope that my images convey a narrative of what support looks like,” Morris says. “How beautiful and freeing and basic it is to be allowed to be one’s self.”

I’m homosexual and afraid

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Last week, the internet-famous New York City street photographer Brandon Stanton posted a poignant picture of an unnamed young boy sharing his fears about being gay. “I’m homosexual and I’m afraid about what my future will be and that people won’t like me,” the boy told Stanton for his wildly popular Humans of New York project. Read more…

“I’m homosexual and I’m afraid about what my future will be and that people won’t like me.”

A photo posted by Humans of New York (@humansofny) on

Salt, so much Salt!

milkboys News & Opinions 34 Comments

The internet is being flooded with all kinds of hilarious and/or disturbing videos by people who are really not happy about everyone having the same basic rights. It’s quite a show they’re putting up…

Those poor, oppressed homophobes who can’t be open about their hate!

This pastor never heard of the separation of church and state…

…and this lady takes the case for dramatic performance (Warning: LOUD!)

Not sure what’s worse, her hateful tirade or her making a vertical video.

 

Periodical Political Post *14

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Queer News

Other News

Love Wins

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National history was made at the U.S. Supreme Court today as the highest court in the land ruled that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to legally marry, in all 50 states and Puerto Rico. This makes the USA the 20th country in the world achieving marriage equality.

rainbow-court

Word of the 5-to-4 decision in Obergefell v. Hodges spread like lightning across all forms of social media, as rainbow memes, pro-marriage cat videos and #LoveWins hashtags zoomed the news around the world in seconds.

Within three hours of the announcement, same sex couples in Georgia started getting married, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Emma Foulkes and Petrina Bloodworth of Atlanta received the first marriage license for a gay couple in Fulton County.

Impromptu celebrations sprung-up across the nation, outside the landmark Stonewall Inn in New York City, where riots by LGBT patrons 46 years ago next week are credited with igniting the modern gay rights movement. Bisexuals and trans couples celebrated as well.

In its ruling, the Court determined that the U.S. Constitution does indeed require states to allow same-sex marriages, effectively striking down existing bans in the 13 states and Puerto Rico, and requires every state in the nation to recognize marriage equality.