Gisberta

milkboys Films, Films & Cinema 5 Comments

Again and again Elisha finds himself confronted by Alex, Timo, Sascha, and Mika – all 14-year-olds living in the boys’ orphanage with him. Their worlds ought to be similar and yet they are completely different. While Elisha builds tiny obstacle courses for ants in the woods, the other boys spend their days watching porn, absorbed in their emerging sexual fantasies.

When the attractive 31-year-old Gisberta is newly employed at the orphanage, she quickly becomes the object of their desires and the boys try to approach her with clumsily aggressive adolescent behavior. Elisha, however, actually gets to know Gisberta.

Alex, who has his eyes everywhere, discovers the two laughing in the kitchen. His erupting jealousy drives the group to continuously humiliate Elisha in any way possible, but this just brings Elisha closer to Gisberta, and a tender friendship develops between them.

But one day the sexual fantasies of the other boys take a turn to brutal reality.

Saving the Lives of Trans Kids is easy: Accept Them.

milkboys Blog, News 18 Comments

The transgender community has disproportionately high levels of depression and anxiety. Though some foolish physicians have suggested this is a fundamental part of being trans, a new study shows that trans kids who are accepted display virtually the same anxiety level as any other kid.

There are disproportionately high rates of anxiety, depression, and suicide among transgender people in the United States. One familiar statistic shows that a startling 41 percent of trans people attempt to take their own life. This data has been used to undermine the gender transition process: Some foolish physicians have suggested that high rates of psychological issues imply that being transgender is destructive to mental health. Meanwhile, trans advocates have argued that mental anguish in the trans population is the result of environmental factors like discrimination, rejection, and harassment—and not the process of transition itself.

New research published in the medical journal Pediatrics corroborates that claim, suggesting that trans kids who are accepted by their communities do not experience disproportionately high rates of mental health issues. The study measured self-reported feelings of anxiety and depression in a given week among 73 transgender children between the ages of three and 12 years old. As NBC reported, “They found the transgender kids averaged an anxiety score of 50.1 on a National Institutes of Health scale—almost the same as the national norm of 50.”

Dr. Stephen Russell is a professor at the University of Texas at Austin specializing in child development and the co-author on another recent study looking at the mental health of LGBT youth. In an interview with Broadly, he explained, “There is no question that disproportionate rates of mental health problems among trans people are due to stigma, discrimination, and hostility in our culture (transphobia).”

“Children look to their primary caregivers for nurturance and support,” he continued. “True rejection is evolutionarily devastating.” Dr. Russell says that in most species it is typically taboo to reject offspring, but something has occurred in our culture that has made it socially acceptable to reject transgender or LGB children.

According to Dr. Russell, we’re just beginning to uncover the real, lasting impacts of discrimination on well-being and health. “We are seeing that even at a physiological level, discrimination may make people chronically physically and mentally stressed.” Transgender kids today may be the first generation of trans youth to grow up with a heightened degree of cultural awareness around trans identity, as well as increased social acceptance. For the majority of trans people who did not grow up in an accepting environment, their coming-of-age process has often been mired in prejudice. It is important for these trans people to learn how to move beyond the trauma of rejection in formative years.

“Acknowledging those experiences is one important step (and the problem with discrimination is that it is usually stigmatized – we often find it too painful to talk about),” Dr. Russell said, adding that in his research he’s observed that “people who are the victims of harassment and discrimination often feel like a burden to the people who matter the most—even when they are supportive. They often feel that they are ‘bringing them down’ because of their (often chronic) harassment or negative experiences.” It’s important for these kids to understand, he said, “that they aren’t a burden to us—that we are angry because we love them and care for them, not because we’d be better off without them.”

To the parents of transgender kids, Dr. Russell said: “Love your child.” That’s obvious, he added, but for parents it may mean an internal overhaul of biases and beliefs. “Examine your feelings and assumptions and biases about gender: boys and girls, men and women, and what you imagine for your child in the future,” Dr. Russell said, adding that parents should seek professional help if their feelings of discomfort are impacting their relationship with their child.

“Gender is a fundamental organizing principle of our society and culture and of growing up,” Dr. Russell explained. “I think gender non-conforming kids need for adults in their lives to say that and to acknowledge that they are special and brave for expressing themselves in ways that will often challenge other people. That is, they need acknowledgement that they may find themselves ‘going against the grain’—they need adults to acknowledge that and let them know that they support them and are proud of them because of, or despite, that.”

Growing up as a transgender kid can be intensely isolating and frightening. If your family rejects you and your peers reject you, it is possible to develop negative ideas about yourself and your identity, and these damaging views can last a lifetime, leading the trans person away from life-sustaining resources. “Gender non-conforming/trans children whose parents regulate their gender are among those that have the hardest time emotionally,” Dr. Russell said, leaving us with one last piece of advice: “Understand that gender is not just one thing. Just love your child for who your child is and will become.”

via Broadly

Young, Gay & Illegal

milkboys Clips & Spots, News & Opinions 21 Comments

Its been 50 years since homosexuality was decriminalised in the UK, and times have changed. Openly gay 13 year old Louis sat down with openly gay 78 year old Percy to have a chat about the differences 50 years have made on gay culture and acceptance.

Quick Personal Update

milkboys Blog 31 Comments

Gonna keep this short: I’m super duper sick at the moment and can’t move much/do anything that requires any kind of energy–hence the lack of posts. I’ll try to make some as soon as possible so please don’t stop coming here <3

Annabel

milkboys Books 12 Comments

“Boy or girl?” It’s the one question people feel safe asking a new mother, since it can hardly cause offence. But what if the answer isn’t straightforward? Even today, in our supposedly broad-minded age, you’d feel a bombshell had been dropped if the proud parent were to reply simply: “Both.”

In Annabel, an intersex baby – one testicle, a penis, one ovary, a womb and a vagina, since you ask – is born to Jacinta. It’s 1968, and she lives in a remote Canadian hamlet with her husband, Treadway, a trapper of few words but strong principles. It is he who decides that the child will be brought up as a boy, to the eternal sorrow of Jacinta, who, unlike him, is quite capable of encompassing her baby’s male and female identities in her love. She feels she has lost a daughter, and a friend secretly christens the baby Annabel behind the minister’s back. So, with a little help from the doctors, young Wayne unwittingly starts life as a boy with, as he puts it later on, a girl curled up inside him. Read on…

Why Hollywood needs Trans Actors

milkboys Films & Cinema, News & Opinions 8 Comments

In this new ScreenCrush video, a group of trans actors discuss Hollywood’s lack of trans representation and why it matters. The video was written by Jen Richards, who expands on a lot of these ideas in her article for Logo’s New Now Next site about the pervasiveness of cis (i.e. non-trans) men playing trans women.

via BoingBoing