PWR BTTM

milkboys Music, Music & Dance 4 Comments

PWR BTTM is an American queer punk duo composed of Liv Bruce and Ben Hopkins. Gender and sexuality are major topics in the music of PWR BTTM. Bruce and Hopkins identify as queer, and address this in the music they make. They discussed the subject of creating “queer” rock music in an interview with Village View:

“We’re queer people, and our truth is that and the music we make, and what we say in our music is representative of who we are . It is us making ourselves feel less alone through our work. Sexuality has always been a part of rock music but that didn’t necessarily mean that it was queer. One of the things that made me excited about writing about my own sexuality and asserting it was doing that in a queer voice and using that to tell a queer story.”

I want a boy, to keep the bed warm while I shower
I want a boy, to keep the bed warm while we’re watching TV
I want a boy, to keep the bed warm when the whole house is freezing
I want a boy, who isn’t anything like me
I want a boy, who doesn’t like to go out shopping
I want a boy, who thinks it’s sexy when my lipstick bleeds
I want a boy, who can go all night without stopping
I want a boy, who knows exactly what he needs

So if you think that you’re the boy for me and I’m the boy for you
Drop me a line at ob8419@bard.edu
Tell me a little bit about yourself, send a picture or two
Hurry up now, because it’s only getting colder

Submitted by Chimel

Reckless

milkboys Films, Films & Cinema 30 Comments

reckless04

Reckless is set in the Scandinavian suburbs during the hottest summer day. It narrates an episode in the life of two siblings. Sofia is a beautiful blonde 15 year old girl and Mads is her little brother. When their parents decide to spend a weekend away, the girl is asked to baby-sit her brother – a task she seems reluctant to execute, so she takes him to the swimming pool. Here, she meets two boys that try to hit on her. Their interest is returned, and she leaves the child to himself, without thinking of the consequences.

It is clear that we are faced with a softly controversial film whose plot moves on two connected wires, where eroticism and social drama are interwoven, in a blurred line between a casual incident and recklessness. On one side, the man focus for Sorensen seems to be softly pushing the magnet of attraction until it reaches the sexual encounter between the teenagers: everything seems to happen with a certain naturalness. He gradually moves towards the intimacy of sex until he reaches a ménage à trois free from every morbidity, respecting the (surprising) innocence of these teens without indulging in an indiscreet gaze. The erotic charge is preserved in its spontaneity, which is not easy to accomplish.

The other strand is linked to the dramatic component that derives from Sofia’s failure to take care of her little brother, a task that her parents gave her perhaps without giving it too much thought.

Even if it would have elements to work on, Reckless does not attempt to engage in a specific discourse, but only wants to suggest something, leaving its message open, impressed on the “skin” of its characters. Several elements hint in this direction: the warmth of the light on the bodies, the cinematography that employs warm tones, the cream smeared on the body, the first physical contact, the water that glides on the bodies in the shower, the drop of blood that falls from Mads’ face. The viewer is left with a feeling of insolvency, taken by a double spiral of dizziness, the erotic charge of love and the violence of Mads’ drama. If the former is vented, the latter is there, suspended, waiting to be let out.

Reckless
Release: 2013, Norway | IMDb | Website

I would have loved to show you the actual short but couldn’t find any source that would have been somewhat legal to link to, let us know in the comments if you had more luck.