Clément

milkboys Films, Films & Cinema 18 Comments

A boy in his teens develops a crush on a grown woman only to discover she is also attracted to him. In this controversial drama from France. Marion (Emmanuelle Bercot) is a headstrong and free-spirited woman in her early thirties who heads to the seacoast for a short vacation that coincides with the birthday of her godson Benoit (Kevin Goffette). Benoit and his friends are just old enough to be enthralled with any conversation involving sex, and Marion humors them by joining in their talks on the beach about the mysteries of women.

Clément

Marion soon gets to know one of Benoit’s friends, Clement (Olivier Gueritee), and the interest between them becomes more than just friendly; some good-natured horseplay stirs a desire between them, and after the two share a kiss on the beach, Clement is obsessed with Marion. While she’s unsure about starting a relationship with a boy less than half her age, Marion can’t deny her feelings for Clement, and before long she and the youngster are lovers. One night, Clement appears at Marion’s doorstep, announcing he’s run away from home and wants to move in with her; Marion isn’t sure what to tell the boy, knowing the foolishness of such a move even though she does love him, and soon Clement is crestfallen, certain that Marion no longer cares for him. Clement was written and directed by Emmanuelle Bercot, who also stars as Marion; the film was shown in the Un Certain Regard series at the 2001 Cannes Film Festival, where it received the Young Cinema Award.

Love is All You Need?

milkboys Films, Films & Cinema 9 Comments

Unique lives intertwine and collide in a world confronted by controversy and forbidden love. This world is very much like our own: filled with family gatherings at church, children playing in the yard, and college frat parties. Except these families are led by same-sex couples, and homosexuality is the expectation. To be heterosexual is to be shunned and ridiculed because it means you are different. In this world, to be gay is right and to be straight is wrong.

33 Teeth, a Short about Length

milkboys Films, Films & Cinema 14 Comments

Eddie is a hormonal 14-year-old boy living alone with his mother in the suburbs. One day after school, he accidentally spies on his attractive older neighbour, Chad, stepping out of the shower and measuring his manhood with a comb.

Kapgang

milkboys Films, Films & Cinema 23 Comments

In a quirky, small town, situated in the outskirts of everything, 14-year-old Martin is getting ready for one of the most formal transitions from boy to man; the communion. Its 1976, music is in the air, hormones are blossoming and Martin is trying get to terms with his confused sexuality. However, in the midst of it all, Martin’s mother suddenly passes away and her tragic death triggers a series of events that not only changes Martin’s life forever, but also affects everyone else in the local community.

There’s a proper trailer as well but sadly it conveniently leaves out the whole queer sub-plot… which didn’t save the film from the critics upset about sex scenes involving teenagers anyway though.

Speed Walking (Original Title: Kapgang)
Release: 2014, Denmark | IMDb | Website

One Clingy Ghost

milkboys Films, Films & Cinema 4 Comments

I have no clue what this is, usually Thai horror films are amazing but this…!?

“Grandpa’s will asked the family to keep & preserve his body in the house with the family; they have been living with it for years and funny occurrences start to happen when the whole family unites to find the secret treasure grandpa left behind somewhere in the house…”

Yeah, that sounds pretty awful :p

Gayby Baby

milkboys Films, Films & Cinema 16 Comments

“Australia is in the midst of a gayby-boom. Twenty-four percent of gay and lesbian couples are now raising a child and their queer spawn are invisibly roaming Australian streets and schools.

In the 70s and 80s, when same-sex marriage and IVF for lesbian mothers was just a pipe dream, some decided not to wait on progress, but to create it. These first generation gaybies have grown-up, and together with an increasing number of gayby children they’re a cultural phenomenon we know nothing about. Who are they? And what is it like to grow up with same-sex parents?

While most kids are grappling with the idea of Man + Woman = Baby, gaybies are fluent in IVF technologies. They are well versed on how to hide their families, see a very different side to sexual discrimination, and it is largely unrecognized that gaybies have to ‘come out’ too. The documentary will explore what our schools are teaching kids about “family”, what exactly is a ‘father figure’ and are they important? And how does a teenager complain about their parents when they’re always trying to prove their family has a right to exist?

Gayby Baby will follow the newest generation of gaybies as they speak openly about their woes and passions; what’s great about their family, and whats not. For some of them, being a gayby doesn’t matter at all, while for others its, at times an uncomfortable reality.”

Submitted by Penboy

Silent T

milkboys Films, Films & Cinema 8 Comments

What is it like to grow up as a transgender teen? This short film, Silent T, is an incredibly inspirational, heartfelt film about the struggle and social injustice some trans people face. It has recently won Best Drama at the world’s largest student film festival, Campus Moviefest.

The Fosters: Queer Childhood

milkboys Clips & Spots, Films & Cinema, Television 41 Comments

The Fosters Explores the Fear and Possibility of Queer Childhood

the-fosters-connorIn the Feb. 9 episode of ABC Family’s The Fosters, 13-year-old Jude goes to the movies on a double date with Connor, his best friend, and Daria and Taylor, two girls from school. It seems Connor and Daria are there to make out, and they have brought Jude and Taylor along as cover.

When Jude takes his seat, Connor pointedly lowers the armrest between them. But after the lights go down, their pinkies touch and then cross. The camera cuts back and forth between their flushed faces, their eyes wide with nervous excitement and surprise at the intensity, while Daria and Taylor absently watch the “chick flick” they’ve supposedly come to see.

The scene is unexpectedly and palpably erotic—a feat that speaks to the richness and complexity with which the show has developed Jude’s storyline over its first two seasons. And yet it is clear that this touch will not provide a neat resolution to the questions about Jude and Connor’s relationship or sexuality, but, rather, will only deepen the exploration.

Jude is not the first queer teenager on television, but he is among the youngest—and he is the first to be raised by queer parents. The Fosters follows a modern family of a kind rarely seen on television—an interracial lesbian couple, Lena and Stef Adams-Foster, and their five racially diverse children: one biological; three adopted, including Jude; and one whose adoption has been repeatedly stalled—Jude’s sister Callie.

It’s a sentimental teen drama that manages at moments to show foster care and LGBTQ parenting with sensitivity and texture. But its most radical move may be in its depiction of Jude, played with thoughtful nuance by Hayden Byerly.

Read on…