Comments 16

  1. I follow your blog on a daily basis and enjoy the benefits, yes, benefits of being able to express your own views and offer us your viewer’s your take on life.

    The same goes for the 20 men. While I honestly come from a generation when using the term gay was the kindest term, I can see how it now may lack for the new Era of homosexual men and women the way to express who they see themselves.

    I certainly feel that what I do in the privacy of my bed does not paint a picture of the complete me, nor should it.

  2. Interesting, but endlessly repetitive, and with the exception of Cole these guys were “boys” when New York was a cow pasture.

    1. Repetitive in general, yes. And mind-numbingly repetitive in the incessant use of the word “like” over and over and over again.

      This has nothing to do with being gay, but aren’t people capable of uttering a sentence these days without inserting “like” at the beginning, middle, and end of said sentence.

      But, despite the Valley-Speak, the boys were, like, totally cute for, like, the most part.

      1. @Al Bendova:
        “This has nothing to do with being gay, but aren’t people capable of uttering a sentence these days without inserting “like” at the beginning, middle, and end of said sentence.”

        Not if you’re from the “Valley” — it all stems from those late 1970s thru 1980s “teen” movies and of course the media at that time …. everyone seeme to think (?) it was “cool” to substitute “like” for “go[es]” or another “comparative” word.

        from http://www.quora.com/How-did-like-become-a-filler-word :

        The use of “like” as a quotative seems to have begun sometime between the 1940s and 1970s. It may or may not have replaced the word “say,” as it was used at the time. Another idea is that it replaces “goes,” as in, “And then he goes ‘She was such a floozie!'” In this sense, “like” introduces quoted speech, hence its designation as “quotative.”

  3. After watch the video, i can only say it’s the same in west europe (i know well a lot of cities). Here in Portugal is basically the same reported in the video. Personally I’m gay, assumed, man and masculine like I feel since I know myself and I don’t believe in the strange necessity of some guys to be “theatrical butterflies”. I respect and like very much the “gay culture”, created apart / clandestine of the regular society, like the art, literature, cinema, etc. made in xx century and before. “gay communities” today are a lot of hollow and sex (and sex without nothing particular, a cock to a cock, only, nothing else).

  4. Lucky them, for having the opportunity to even think about this issue, let alone opine on camera about it. Why, when I was their age… (never mind, you know the rest).

    1. You make an important point. While I can relate to their sentiment of “I like boys, and I don’t beed a label” it does kind of fly in the face of the history, and what got us to the point where we can “just like boys” and have it be more generally accepted by the public.

  5. I don’t know why this has NYC in the title, the views are totally cool, it’s pretty much how I feel, but tagging NYC on there just comes across as elitist and probably isn’t a fair representation of New York City’s LGBT+ community.

  6. I had my pesonal epiphany when I had to come to grips with puberty while immersed in a papal seminary in the early 1950s. That’s very long ago now and I’ve seen new cultural landscapes emerge, great energies released, and opportunities arise that need not be trapped in a false dichotomy. I’ve no illusions about my current time of life – my personal sun has set in part because these otherwise refreshing young voices are understandably inner-directed or peer-directed. What will circumstances be for them 50 or 60 years from now? How can such distant horizons be discussed intergenerationally? How not be type-cast as a troll or a chicken hawk and thereby dismissed? No answers yet – this is all too new.

    1. @Fred Markus:
      “I had my pesonal epiphany when I had to come to grips with puberty while immersed in a papal seminary in the early 1950s.”

      I don’t know if that is worse or “better” than my experiences: forced to go to a southern baptist church for a year and then being put into a private religious (evangelical baptist influenced) school (live-in at a dormitory) and then going to a 2-week “jesus camp” (although it wasn’t called that then — it was nicely referred to as a “baptist/christian retreat in the mountains around Shreveport, LA.

      And, like you, it was smack in the middle of my puberty ….. oh, did I forget to mention? ….. this school was an all boys school. Now, imagine your hormones flowing through your body in this situation with some very attractive boys ….. shall I say, “close at hand” to “observe” and to “share puberty experiences” (get the picture?).

  7. Out but not proud? Not gay as in queer, but homosexual as in…mostly irrelevant to my personal identity.

  8. Interesting comments on stereotype in the video – specifically, the idea of “straight acting”.

    It seems that, while attempting to denounce the stereotype of “gay”, they stereotype the specific subset of “straight acting” gays.

    All in all, though, I get it. The young generation of “gay”/”we like boys, or whatever” seems like they just want to like boys if they like boys and not have to be labeled. I’m on board with that. I’m the same way – but, at the very same time, I feel like maybe we’re losing something – specifically the culture and history that brought us to the point of even being able to remove labels and just “like boys”.

  9. Really Great Stuff……………

    sadly the “when I was your age” and “well lets see how they like ti when they are old” TRIPE is shining through in SOME of comments

    NEWS FLASH: these young men are LIVING the PRESENT and, if they were properly informed, would likely admire the matachine society and their ilk but the harping by people who whine and complain about speech mannerism [Oh. Come. On…] and their haircuts, are Missing. The. Point. same way you’ve missed the impact of those who seek to exploit our community [I’m looking at YOU anheiser busch, et al] but could NOT care less about the well being of same commmunity.]

    I find their comments about pop culture, the willingness of the queer community to embrace / endorse ideas whose genesis is found in the people who HATE us [ALL of US], the general vacuousness of much of the Queer community to be Very prescient.

    HOWEVER the MOST serious Truth is the “i don’t wanna fuck you, I just wanna be your friend” thoughts voiced by one participant… just sayin’

    I don’t care if they are from NYC, Venus or Mars… right is right.

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